microphoneHave a high-pitched voice? Chances are, you prefer masculine men with deeper voices over guys who use mid-range or higher notes when they speak, say researchers from the University of Aberdeen in Scotland.

In their 2010 study, women with the highest-pitched voices who listened to recordings of men saying “I really like you” or “I really don’t like you” were 20% more likely to believe the men with the deeper voices were attractive regardless of what they were saying than women with lower-pitched voices.

The link? Researchers point a finger squarely at your hormones. A high-pitched voice in women is an indicator of a high estrogen level and a deep-pitched voice in men is an indicator of a high testosterone level, which is a common romantic pairing since these high hormones are key indicators of fertility and health, raising the chances of having lots of offspring.

Voices are also a key indicator of personality, with high voices in women suggesting traditionally feminine traits—such as agreeableness, empathy and cooperation—and low voices in men suggesting traditionally masculine traits—such as a dominant personality and competitiveness (picture the stereotype of the cheerleader and the football player).

Women and men with mid-range voices and, therefore, hormones (like me and my husband) meet somewhere in the middle personality-wise.

But, this doesn’t mean women like me aren’t affected by a throaty male voice. Fact is, at mid-cycle during ovulation when estrogen is highest, most women find deeper tones hard to resist, past research shows.

So, what do you think? Based on the high or low pitch of your voice, does the research stack up? When you think of your friends, are the higher-pitched gals more drawn to brawny partners? I’d love to know!

 

[photo: CarbonNYC]