clock2I like to consider myself an early morning person–someone who leaps out of bed first-thing brimming with energy and ready to tackle my day.

But, I recently realized that I’m not. Well, at least not throughout my entire monthly cycle.

Turns out, I’m only a morning person during the first half of my cycle–my Week 1 and Week 2, which starts with the onset of menstruation and lasts through ovulation.

For the second half–my Week 3 and Week 4–I realized I’m an early afternoon person. My mental and physical engines don’t start to rev till around 11 to 12.

And, that’s important because knowing when your energy is peaking during your day–and how this energy peak shifts–can be a big help. Here’s why:

When you know your most energetic time of day, you can sync it up with the amount of energy you’re going to have based on where you are in your monthly cycle:

In the first half, you tend to have more intense, longer-lasting pep. In the second half, you tend to have a less intense, shorter-lasting pep.

You can then plan your important to-dos during that higher-energy window of time–and have a rough estimate of how many tasks you can fit in based on how high your energy will go and how long it will last before it peters out.

So, today I’d like you to start a journal (or use the note-taking feature on my Hormone Horoscope App) to pinpoint when your most energetic time of day is in each week of your cycle. Then, use that information to do all your most important to-dos during that window of time.

By syncing your daily rhythms with your monthly rhythms, you may find you get a lot more accomplished.

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[Photo: Robert Van Der Steeg]