readerquestion4Back in July, I wrote a post answering some frequently asked questions–mostly about what the heck Hormonology and the Hormone Horoscope are and who in the world I am.

Since then, I’ve received a lot more questions–and some of them have been asked repeatedly–so I figure it’s time to answer a few more. Here we go:

What is the difference between the days and weeks in my cycle? Which do I follow for my Hormone Horoscope?

So, here’s the deal–and how I accidentally made this a bit confusing: You can read your Hormone Horoscope two ways–based on the day you’re on in your cycle and based on the week you’re on in your cycle.

Let me explain:

Your hormone levels change day by day in your cycle, exerting a different effect every day.

However, for the most part, your hormones’ effects also follow a weekly pattern. Meaning, in Week 1, estrogen is low-but-rising. In Week 2, estrogen is high and testosterone is high. In Week 3, progesterone rises. In Week 4, estrogen dips.

That’s why in my free Hormone Horoscope App (and my old book, 28 Days), I offer a Hormone Horoscope for every day of your cycle, Day 1, Day 2, Day 3, etc.

It’s also why in my Hormone Horoscope App, I color code each week of your cycle–Week 1 is pink, Week 2 is green, Week 3 is orange and Week 4 is blue. Just so you know which week you’re in.

And then, in my Hormonology newsletter and on this HormoneHoroscope.com website, I offer a Hormone Horoscope based on the week you’re on in your cycle–Week 1, Week 2, Week 3 and Week 4.

Either way you prefer–daily or weekly–you’ll get an accurate Hormone Horoscope. I just offer it two different ways depending on how I’m delivering it.

How come I signed up for the daily Hormonology email newsletter, but I don’t get it every day?

In some cases, I’ve included a word or phrase in my newsletter that your email spam filter doesn’t like so it blocks it or throws it into your spam folder. I can’t predict which of my bon mots are going to trigger a block, but I do try to avoid the obvious ones.

Other times you don’t get a newsletter because, well, I’ve simply run out of time. Sorry about that! I’m on constant deadline for articles for my editors, I get pretty gnarly migraines that can suddenly sideline me without warning and I’m doing all this Hormonology stuff single-handedly–including writing the new book and doing lots of other behind-the-scenes hormone stuff–that takes up an enormous amount of time. Each newsletter alone takes at least one to two hours to write. Sometimes a lot longer depending on the amount of research needed.

And, somewhere in the midst of all of that, I’m trying to learn to actually have a life–you know, read a book, plant a garden, learn to drive a stick shift–which is an entirely new concept for me. And I admit I still haven’t figured out how to fit something non-worky into my schedule.

As a result, I can get a bit behind fairly quickly. But, I do try my best to stick to the five-day schedule. Or make up for a missed weekday with a weekend post. Or just humbly beg your forgiveness!

Can you make a Hormonology app/write a book/offer a daily Hormone Horoscope/do YouTube videos for young teens/perimenopausal women/menopausal women/for men about women/for women about men, etc., etc.?

I’m working on it all. I just need a bit of time. (See above reasons why!) But, rest assured, each piece is coming together.

Why don’t you charge money or have a fundraising page? Will you be charging in the future?

As many of you have keenly noticed, my website, newsletter and Hormone Horoscope App are all free. And I support all this Hormonology stuff with my own job as a health journalist.

I just figure if I can get this great information about our  hormone cycles out there without charging a dime, then you’ll be able to use right away.

As for fundraising websites, quite a lot of you have suggested this to me as a way to be able to devote more time to Hormonology. There are a lot of great causes worth putting your money toward on those websites. I’ve donated toward quite a few myself. But, for me, it’s just not my thing.

This doesn’t mean everything in the future of Hormonology is going to be free: I’ll be charging for my forthcoming books and some really cool apps I’ve been working on. (Told ya–I’ve been really busy!)

But, the bulk of the information you need about your cycle is going to always be free. The other stuff I’ll be charging for will just be reaaalllly cool to have : )

I wrote to you yesterday/last week/two weeks ago. How come you haven’t written back yet?

Again, I’ve been really busy. Plus, I’ve received a ton more emails lately. But, I do try to answer all of the emails I receive. Some, however, require a bit of research because of the question being asked, which can slow things down a bit.

How do you come up with topics to write about in your Hormonology posts every day?

This question pops up a lot, which surprises me. Honestly, there’s a lot to write about, so it’s really a matter of whittling down the topics. And how I decide on a topic comes down to a combination of what new research is out there, what subject hasn’t been covered lately, what’s happened in my own life to inspire a Hormonology post and what questions I receive from readers like you.

So, if you have a topic suggestion or question, let me know–and it could be in a future Hormonology post!

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