jawboneI recently wrote about the very important and study-proven reasons why you shouldn’t rely on any app to get pregnant or avoid pregnancy including my own Hormone Horoscope menstrual cycle tracker. And, I still stand by that since technology isn’t reliable enough to put a baby–or not a baby–on the line.

However, I’m still a big fan of apps and tools that help you pinpoint ovulation because it’s the key indicator that you’re transitioning from the first half of your cycle to the second half–which, in many ways, can be polar opposites of each other. So, that day is important to know when you want to predict your mood, energy, sleep habits, health and behavior. But, if the app or tool is a day or so off when predicting ovulation for this purpose, ultimately it’s no big deal. At least not of baby-making or baby-avoiding proportions.

So, I’m intrigued by this news from the period-tracking and fertility app company Clue that a small  internal pilot study (involving six women) shows that a wearable fitness tracker has the potential to predict ovulation. It does so by monitoring your resting heart rate (RHR), which changes across your menstrual cycle, climbing higher during ovulation and the luteal phase (the second half of your cycle) than it is normally during the first half of your cycle (the follicular phase). When your RHR goes up, it means you’ve ovulated. Or that you’re pregnant, which was evidently the case with the company’s director of marketing who wore the sensor and discovered she was expecting.

This research is due to be presented at the annual meeting of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. I imagine a more formal study will likely be conducted and published in a journal somewhere. And, at some point soon after you may be finding that your FitBit or other wearable sensor will be telling you when you’re ovulating. Stay tuned and I’ll update you when there’s more info.