28 Days Endnotes

Below are links to the studies cited in the Endnotes section of 28 Days: What Your Cycle Reveals About Your Moods, Health and Potential by Gabrielle Lichterman.

Preface

1. Ian S. Penton-Voak, et al., “Menstrual cycle alters face preference,” Nature, 399 (1999): 741-742. (Link)

2. M. Altmann, E. Knowles, H. D. Bull, “A psychosomatic study of the sex cycle in women,” Psychosomatic Medicine, 3 (1941): 199-224. (Link)

3. “Women’s skills linked to estrogen levels,” The Free Library. 1988. Science Service Inc., retrieved online April 3, 2019. (Link)

4. “Female Sex Hormone Is Tied To Ability to Perform Tasks,” The New York Times, November 18, 1988, A00001. (Link)

Day 1

1. Annett Welz, et al. “Anxiety and rumination moderate menstrual cycle effects on mood in daily life,” Women & Health, 56 (2016): 540-560. (Link)

2. Andrée-Anne Hudon Thibeault, J. Thomas Sanderson, Cathy Vaillancourt, “Serotonin-estrogen interactions: what can we learn from pregnancy?” Biochimie, in press accepted manuscript, available online April 1, 2019. (Link)
Crystal Edler Schiller, et al., “Reproductive Steroid Regulation of Mood and Behavior,” Comprehensive Physiology, 6 (2016): 1135-1160. (Link)
Amanda P. Borrow, Nicole M. Cameron, “Estrogenic mediation of serotonergic and neurotrophic systems: Implications for female mood disorders,” Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry, 53 (2014): 13-25. (Link)
David R Rubinow, Peter J Schmidt, Catherine A Roca, “Estrogen-serotonin interactions: implications for affective regulation,” Biological Psychiatry, 44 (1998): 839-850. (Link)
Barbara E. H. Sumner, George Fink, “Estrogen increases the density of 5-hydroxytryptamine(2A) receptors in cerebral cortex and nucleus accumbens in the female rat,” The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 54 (1995): 15-20. (Link)

3. Aila Collins, Peter Eneroth, Brut‐Marie Landgren, “Psychoneuroendocrine stress responses and mood as related to the menstrual cycle,” Psychosomatic Medicine, 47 (1985): 512-527. (Link)

4. Paul Vaucher, et al., “Effect of iron supplementation on fatigue in nonanemic menstruating women with low ferritin: a randomized controlled trial,” CMAJ, 184 (2012): 1247-1254. (Link)

5. Iron: Fact Sheet for Health Professionals, National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements, retrieved online April 13, 2019. (Link)

6. NeginSattari, et al., “The effect of sex and menstrual phase on memory formation during a nap,” Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, 145 (2017): 119-128. (Link)
Liisa A.M. Galea, “Why estrogens matter for behavior and brain health,” Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, 76 (2017): 363-379. (Link)
Elizabeth Hampson, Erin E. Morley, “Estradiol concentrations and working memory performance in women of reproductive age,” Psychoneuroendocrinology, 38 (2013): 2897-2904. (Link)
Lauren Rosenberg, Sohee Park, “Verbal and spatial functions across the menstrual cycle in healthy young women,” Psychoneuroendocrinology, 27 (2002): 835-841. (Link)
Rosemarie Krug, et al., “Jealousy, general creativity, and coping with social frustration during the menstrual cycle,” Archives of Sexual Behavior, 25 (1996): 181-199. (Link)
Rosemarie Krug, et al., “Effects of menstrual cycle on creativity,” Psychoneuroendocrinology, 19 (1994): 21-31. (Link)

7. Sonja Schöning, et al., “Functional anatomy of visuo-spatial working memory during mental rotation is influenced by sex, menstrual cycle, and sex steroid hormones,” Neuropsychologia, 45 (2007): 3203-3214. (Link)
Marcus Hausmann, et al., “Sex hormones affect spatial abilities during the menstrual cycle,” Behavioral Neuroscience, 114 (2000): 1245-1250. (Link)
M. Suzanne Moody, “Changes in scores on the Mental Rotations Test during the menstrual cycle,” Perceptual and Motor Skills, 84 (1997): 955-961. (Link)
Irwin Silverman, Krista Phillips, “Effects of estrogen changes during the menstrual cycle on spatial performance,” Ethology and Social Biology, 14 (1993): 257-269. (Link)
Elizabeth Hampson, “Estrogen-related variations in human spatial and articulatory-motor skills,” Psychoneuroendocrinology, 15 (1990): 97-111. (Link)
Elizabeth Hampson, Doreen Kimura, “Reciprocal effects of hormonal fluctuations on human motor and perceptual-spatial skills,” Behavioral Neuroscience, 102 (1988): 456-459. (Link)

8. Veena Kumari, Philip J. Corr, “Trait anxiety, stress and the menstrual cycle: Effects on Raven’s Standard Progressive Matrices test,” Personality and Individual Differences, 24 (1998): 615-623. (Link)

9. Edmund Keogh, et al. “The effects of menstrual-related pain on attentional interference,” Pain, 155 (2014): 821-827. (Link)
Ulrike Bingel, et al., “fMRI Reveals How Pain Modulates Visual Object Processing in the Ventral Visual Stream,” Neuron, 55 (2007): 157-167. (Link)
Chris Eccleston, Geert Crombez, “Pain demands attention: A cognitive–affective model of the interruptive function of pain,” Psychological Bulletin, 125 (1999): 356-366. (Link)

10. Junyoung Jo, Sun Haeng Lee, “Heat therapy for primary dysmenorrhea: A systematic review and meta-analysis of its effects on pain relief and quality of life,” Scientific Reports, 8 (2018): published online November 2, 2018. (Link)
Sylvester EmekaIgwea, et al., “TENS and heat therapy for pain relief and quality of life improvement in individuals with primary dysmenorrhea: A systematic review,” Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, 24 (2016): 86-91. (Link)
Dilek Coşkuner Potur, Nuran Kömürcü, “The effects of local low-dose heat application on dysmenorrhea,” Journal of Pediatric & Adolescent Gynecology, 27 (2014): 216-221. (Link)
Shahindokht Navvabi Rigi, et al., “Comparing the analgesic effect of heat patch containing iron chip and ibuprofen for primary dysmenorrhea: a randomized controlled trial,” BMC Women’s Health, 22 (2012): published online August 22, 2012. (Link)

11. Myeong Soo Lee, et al., “Aromatherapy for Managing Pain in Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Systematic Review of Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trials,” Journal of Clinical Medicine, 7 (2018): published online November 10, 2018. (Link)
Necdet Sut, Hatice Kahyaoglu-Sut, “Effect of aromatherapy massage on pain in primary dysmenorrhea: A meta-analysis,” Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, 27 (2017): 5-10. (Link)
Tyseer M. F. Marzouk, Amina M. R. El-Nemer, Hany N. Baraka, “The Effect of Aromatherapy Abdominal Massage on Alleviating Menstrual Pain in Nursing Students: A Prospective Randomized Cross-Over Study,” Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 2013 (2013): published online April 11, 2013. (Link)

12. L. C. Pallavi, Urban John D. Souza, G. Shivaprakash, “Assessment of Musculoskeletal Strength and Levels of Fatigue during Different Phases of Menstrual Cycle in Young Adults,” Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research, 11 (2017): CC11-CC13. (Link)

13. Paul Vaucher, et al., “Effect of iron supplementation on fatigue in nonanemic menstruating women with low ferritin: a randomized controlled trial,” CMAJ, 184 (2012): 1247-1254. (Link)

14. Pirkko Peuranpää, et al., “Effects of anemia and iron deficiency on quality of life in women with heavy menstrual bleeding,” Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, 93 (2014): 654-660. (Link)

15. Esther Diekhof, “Be quick about it. Endogenous estradiol level, menstrual cycle phase and trait impulsiveness predict impulsive choice in the context of reward acquisition,” Hormones and Behavior, 74 (2015): 186-193. (Link)

16. Peter C. Butera, “Estradiol and the control of food intake,” Physiology & Behavior, 99 (2010): 175-180. (Link)
Louise Dye, John Blundell, “Menstrual cycle and appetite control: implications for weight regulation,” Human Reproduction, 12 (1997): 1142-1151. (Link)
Susan L. Barr, K. Christina Janelle, Jerilynn C. Prior, “Energy intakes are higher during the luteal phase of ovulatory menstrual cycles,” The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 61 (1995): 39-43. (Link)
William G. Johnson, “Energy regulation over the menstrual cycle,” Physiology & Behavior, 56 (1994): 523-527. (Link)

17. Erica M. Schulte, et al., “Development of the Highly Processed Food Withdrawal Scale,” Appetite, 131 (2018): 148-154. (Link)

18. Julie A. Woosley, Kenneth L. Lichtstein, “Dysmenorrhea, the Menstrual Cycle, and Sleep,” Behavioral Medicine, 40 (2014): 14-21. (Link)

19. Eunsook Sun, et al., “Effects of follicular versus luteal phase-based strength training in young women,” SpringerPlus, 668 (2014): published online November 11, 2014. (Link)
Nina RW Geiker, et al., “A weight-loss program adapted to the menstrual cycle increases weight loss in healthy, overweight, premenopausal women: a 6-mo randomized controlled trial,” The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 104 (2016): 15-20. (Link)

20. Sarah McKinley-Barnard, et al., “Effectiveness of Fish Oil Supplementation in Attenuating Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage in Women During Midfollicular and Midluteal Menstrual Phases,” Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 32 (2018): 1601-1612. (Link)
Timmons Williams, et al., “The effect of estrogen on muscle damage biomarkers following prolonged aerobic exercise in eumenorrheic women,” Biology of Sport, 32 (2015): 193-198. (Link)

21. Ann E. Caldwell Hooper, Angela D. Bryan, Melissa Eaton, “Menstrual cycle effects on perceived exertion and pain during exercise among sedentary women,” Journal of Women’s Health, 20 (2011): 439-446. (Link)

22. Junyoung Jo, Sun Haeng Lee, “Heat therapy for primary dysmenorrhea: A systematic review and meta-analysis of its effects on pain relief and quality of life,” Scientific Reports, 8 (2018): published online November 2, 2018. (Link)
Sylvester EmekaIgwea, et al., “TENS and heat therapy for pain relief and quality of life improvement in individuals with primary dysmenorrhea: A systematic review,” Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, 24 (2016): 86-91. (Link)
Dilek Coşkuner Potur, Nuran Kömürcü, “The effects of local low-dose heat application on dysmenorrhea,” Journal of Pediatric & Adolescent Gynecology, 27 (2014): 216-221. (Link)
Shahindokht Navvabi Rigi, et al., “Comparing the analgesic effect of heat patch containing iron chip and ibuprofen for primary dysmenorrhea: a randomized controlled trial,” BMC Women’s Health, 22 (2012): published online August 22, 2012. (Link)

23. Nikhat Fatima, et al., “Pain Perception and Anxiety Levels during Menstrual Cycle Associated with Periodontal Therapy,” International Journal of Dentistry, 2014: published online October 12, 2014. (Link)
Taraneh Rezaii, et al., “The influence of menstrual phases on pain modulation in healthy women,” The Journal of Pain, 13 (2012): 646-655. (Link)
Yannick Tousignant-Laflamme, Serge Marchand, “Excitatory and inhibitory pain mechanisms during the menstrual cycle in healthy women,” Pain, 146 (2009): 47-55. (Link)

24. Stella Iacovides, Ingrid Avidon, Fiona C. Baker, “Women with dysmenorrhoea are hypersensitive to experimentally induced forearm ischaemia during painful menstruation and during the pain-free follicular phase,” European Journal of Pain, 19 (2015): 797-804. (Link)
Helen Slater, et al., “Heightened cold pain and pressure pain sensitivity in young female adults with moderate-to-severe menstrual pain,” Pain, 156 (2015): 2468-2478. (Link)
Stella Iacovides, et al., “Women With Dysmenorrhea Are Hypersensitive to Experimental Deep Muscle Pain Across the Menstrual Cycle,” The Journal of Pain, 14 (2013): 1066-1076. (Link)

25. Bülent Güven, Hayat Güven, Selçuk Çomoğlu, “Clinical characteristics of menstrually related and non-menstrual migraine,” Acta Neurologica Belgica, 177 (2017): 671-676. (Link)

26. Matthew T. Bernstein, et al., “Gastrointestinal symptoms before and during menses in healthy women,” BMC Women’s Health, 14 (2014): published online January 22, 2014. (Link)
Aykut Ferhat Çelik, et al., “How prevalent are alterations in bowel habits during menses?” Diseases of the Colon & Rectum, 44 (2001): 300-301. (Link)
Margaret M. Heitkemper, Joan Shaver, Ellen Sullivan Mitchell, “Gastrointestinal Symptoms and Bowel Patterns Across the Menstrual Cycle in Dysmenorrhea,” Nursing Research, 37 (1988): 108-113. (Link)

27. Monica Jarrett, et al., “Relationship between gastrointestinal and dysmenorrheic symptoms at menses,” Research in Nursing & Health, 19 (1996): 45-51. (Link)
C. Arthur, Marvin E. Ement, Moon K. Song, “Prostaglandin metabolism in relation to the bowel habits of women,” Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids, 46 (1992): 257-259. (Link)

28. Alessandra Graziottin, Audrey Serafini, “Perimenstrual asthma: from pathophysiology to treatment strategies,” Multidisciplinary Respiratory Medicine, 11 (2016): published online August 1, 2016. (Link)
Chitra K. Rao, “Characteristics of perimenstrual asthma and its relation to asthma severity and control: data from the Severe Asthma Research Program,” Chest, 143 (2013): 984-992. (Link)

29. Andrew G Herzog, “Catamenial epilepsy: Update on prevalence, pathophysiology and treatment from the findings of the NIH Progesterone Treatment Trial,” Seizure, 28 (2015): 18-25. (Link)

30. Shishira Bharadwaj, et al., “Symptomatology of irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease during the menstrual cycle,” Gastroenterology Report, 3 (2015): 185-193. (Link)
Lesley A. Houghton, et al., “The menstrual cycle affects rectal sensitivity in patients with irritable bowel syndrome but not healthy volunteers,” Gut, 50 (2002): 471-474. (Link)

31. Caroline Morini Calil, et al., “Influence of gender and menstrual cycle on volatile sulphur compounds production,” Archives of Oral Biology, 53 (2008): 1107-1112 (Link)

32. Denise Falcone, et al., “Sensitive skin and the influence of female hormone fluctuations: results from a cross-sectional digital survey in the Dutch population,” European Journal of Dermatology, 27 (2017): 42-48. (Link)

33. Kimberly Ann Yonkers, P. M. Shaughn O’Brien, Elias Eriksson, “Premenstrual syndrome,” The Lancet, 371 (2008): 1200-1210. (Link)

34. Elizabeth R. Bertone-Johnson, et al., “Calcium and vitamin D intake and risk of incident premenstrual syndrome,” Archives of Internal Medicine, 165 (2005): 1246-1252. (Link)
Fatemeh Abdi, Gity Ozgoli, Fatemeh Sadat Rahnemaie, “A systematic review of the role of vitamin D and calcium in premenstrual syndrome,” Obstetrics & Gynecology Science, 62 (2019): 73-86. (Link)
Susan Thys-Jacobs, et al., “Calcium carbonate and the premenstrual syndrome: effects on premenstrual and menstrual symptoms. Premenstrual Syndrome Study Group,” American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 179 (1998): 444-452. (Link)

35. Elizabeth R. Bertone-Johnson, et al., “Dietary vitamin D intake, 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels and premenstrual syndrome in a college-aged population,” The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 121 (2010): 434-437. (Link)

36. Nahid Sohrabi, et al., “Evaluation of the effect of omega-3 fatty acids in the treatment of premenstrual syndrome: a pilot trial,” Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 21 (2013): 141-146. (Link)

37. Patricia Chocano-Bedoya, et al., “Intake of selected minerals and risk of premenstrual syndrome,” American Journal of Epidemiology, 177 (2013): 1118–1127. (Link)

38. Polyanna Arruda, et al., “Vocal Acoustic and Auditory-Perceptual Characteristics During Fluctuations in Estradiol Levels During the Menstrual Cycle: A Longitudinal Study,” Journal of Voice, published online March 7, 2018. (Link)

Day 2

1. Rong Yang, et al., “Postpartum estrogen withdrawal impairs GABAergic inhibition and LTD induction in basolateral amygdala complex via down-regulation of GPR30,” European Neuropsychopharmacology, 27 (2017): 759-772. (Link)
Zhuan Zhang, et al., “Postpartum estrogen withdrawal impairs hippocampal neurogenesis and causes depression- and anxiety-like behaviors in mice,” Psychoneuroendocrinology, 66 (2016): 138-149. (Link)

2. Johannes Bitzer, “Hormone withdrawal-associated symptoms: overlooked and under-explored,” Gynecological Endocrinology, 29 (2013): 530-535. (Link)

3. Peter J. Schmidt, et al., “Effects of Estradiol Withdrawal on Mood in Women With Past Perimenopausal Depression: A Randomized Clinical Trial,” JAMA Psychiatry, 72 (2015): 714-726. (Link)

4. Claudio N. Soares, “Depression in Peri- and Postmenopausal Women: Prevalence, Pathophysiology and Pharmacological Management,” Drugs & Aging, 30 (2013): 677-685. (Link)

5. Hadine Joffe, et al., “Independent Contributions of Nocturnal Hot Flashes and Sleep Disturbance to Depression in Estrogen-Deprived Women,” The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 101 (2016): 3847-3855. (Link)
Stephanie Leigh Douma, et al., “Estrogen-related mood disorders: reproductive life cycle factors,” Advances in Nursing Science, 28 (2005): 364-375. (Link)

6. Robert L. Reid, S.S.C. Yen, “Premenstrual syndrome,” American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology, 139 (1981): 85-104. (Link)

7. Mudi H. Alharbi, et al., “Flavonoid-rich orange juice is associated with acute improvements in cognitive function in healthy middle-aged males,” European Journal of Nutrition, 55 (2016): 2021-2029. (Link)

8. Andrew Scholey, Lauren Owen, “Effects of chocolate on cognitive function and mood: a systematic review,” Nutrition Reviews, 71 (2013): 665-681. (Link)
David T. Field, Claire M. Williams, Laurie T. Butler, “Consumption of cocoa flavanols results in an acute improvement in visual and cognitive functions,” Physiology & Behavior, 103 (2011): 255-260. (Link)

9. Derek D. Randolph, Patrick J. O’Connor, “Stair walking is more energizing than low dose caffeine in sleep deprived young women,” Physiology & Behavior, 174 (2017): 128-135. (Link)

10. Anne U. Gold, et al., “Improving spatial thinking skills among undergraduate geology students through short online training exercises,” International Journal of Science Education, 40 (2018): 2205-2225. (Link)

11. Larissa A. Mead, Elizabeth Hampson, “Turning Bias in Humans Is Influenced by Phase of the Menstrual Cycle,” Hormones and Behavior, 31 (1997): 65-74. (Link)

Day 3

1. Belinda Pletzer, Ourania Petasis, Larry Cahill, “Switching between forest and trees: opposite relationship of progesterone and testosterone to global-local processing,” Hormones and Behavior, 66 (2014): 257-266. (Link)

Day 4

1. Jean-Claude Dreher, et al., “Menstrual cycle phase modulates reward-related neural function in women,” PNAS, 104 (2007): 2465-2470. (Link)

2. Christopher T. Smith, et al., “Ovarian Cycle Effects on Immediate Reward Selection Bias in Humans: A Role for Estradiol,” The Journal of Neuroscience, 34 (2014): 5468-5476. (Link)

3. Huiyong Zheng, et al. “Actigraphy-defined measures of sleep and movement across the menstrual cycle in midlife menstruating women: Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation Sleep Study,” Menopause, 22 (2015): 66-74. (Link)
Julie A. Woosley, Kenneth L. Lichtstein, “Dysmenorrhea, the Menstrual Cycle, and Sleep,” Behavioral Medicine, 40 (2014): 14-21. (Link)
Fiona C. Baker, Helen S. Driver, “Self-reported sleep across the menstrual cycle in young, healthy women,” Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 56 (2004). (Link)

4. Raina D. Pang, Nafeesa Andrabi, Adam M. Leventhal, “Premenstrual symptoms and factors implicated in smoking cessation among woman smokers,” Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology, 25 (2017): 235-241. (Link)
Alicia M. Allen, et al., “Severity of withdrawal symptomatology in follicular versus luteal quitters: The combined effects of menstrual phase and withdrawal on smoking cessation outcome,” Addictive Behaviors, 35 (2010): 549-552. (Link)
Kenneth A. Perkins, et al., “Tobacco withdrawal in women and menstrual cycle phase,” Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 68 (2000): 176-180. (Link)

5. Christopher T. Smith, et al., “Ovarian Cycle Effects on Immediate Reward Selection Bias in Humans: A Role for Estradiol,” The Journal of Neuroscience, 34 (2014): 5468-5476. (Link)

6. Anne H. Calhoun, Nicole Gill, “Presenting a New, Non-Hormonally Mediated Cyclic Headache in Women: End-Menstrual Migraine,” Headache, 57 (2017): 17-20. (Link)
Iron: Fact Sheet for Health Professionals, National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements, retrieved online April 13, 2019. (Link)

7. Andrea Scheuringer and Belinda Pletzer, “Sex Differences and Menstrual Cycle Dependent Changes in Cognitive Strategies during Spatial Navigation and Verbal Fluency,” Frontiers in Psychology, 8 (2017): published online March 17, 2017. (Link)

Day 5

1. A growing body of evidence shows that as estrogen rises, the effects of testosterone increase with it. We’re seeing this with research on postmenopausal women who are given synthetic estrogen alone, synthetic testosterone alone and the two hormones together. What researchers are finding is that giving this hormone combination rather than estrogen or testosterone alone has a greater influence on sexual arousal in postmenopausal women. It’s likely because estrogen helps receptors take up testosterone. So, the more estrogen your body creates, the more testosterone your body uses—even when its level is relatively flat for the majority of your menstrual cycle. Since testosterone is a hormone that impacts libido, the higher your estrogen level climbs, the greater the libido-enhancing effects of testosterone become. Here are a few studies that suggest this:
Maurand Cappelletti, Kim Wallen, “Increasing women’s sexual desire: The comparative effectiveness of estrogens and androgens,” Hormones and Behavior, 78 (2016): 178-193. (Link)
Johanna Archer, et al., “Effect of estradiol versus estradiol and testosterone on brain-activation patterns in postmenopausal women,” Menopause, 13 (2006): 528-537. (Link)
Angelique Flöter, et al., “Addition of testosterone to estrogen replacement therapy in oophorectomized women: effects on sexuality and well-being,” Climacteric, 5 (2002): 357-365. (Link)

2. Huiyong Zheng, et al. “Actigraphy-defined measures of sleep and movement across the menstrual cycle in midlife menstruating women: Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation Sleep Study,” Menopause, 22 (2015): 66-74. (Link)
Julie A. Woosley, Kenneth L. Lichtstein, “Dysmenorrhea, the Menstrual Cycle, and Sleep,” Behavioral Medicine, 40 (2014): 14-21. (Link)
Fiona C. Baker, Helen S. Driver, “Self-reported sleep across the menstrual cycle in young, healthy women,” Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 56 (2004): 239-243. (Link)

3. Ercument Cavdar, et al., “Changes in tear film, corneal topography, and refractive status in premenopausal women during menstrual cycle,” Contact Lens & Anterior Eye, 37 (2014): 209-212. (Link)
Piera Versura, Michela Fresina, Emilio C. Campos, “Ocular surface changes over the menstrual cycle in women with and without dry eye,” Gynecological Endocrinology, 23 (2007): 385-390. (Link)

4. Flávia L. Osório, “Sex Hormones and Processing of Facial Expressions of Emotion: A Systematic Literature Review,” Frontiers in Psychology, 9 (2018): published online April 11, 2018. (Link)
Birgit Derntl, et al., “Association of menstrual cycle phase with the core components of empathy,” Hormones and Behavior, 63 (2013): 97-104. (Link)
Birgit Derntl, et al., “Emotion recognition accuracy in healthy young females is associated with cycle phase,” Hormones and Behavior, 53 (2008): 90-95. (Link)
Birgit Derntl, et al., “Facial emotion recognition and amygdala activation are associated with menstrual cycle phase,” Psychoneuroendocrinology, 33 (2008): 1031-1040. (Link)

Day 6

1. Thomas Buser, “The impact of the menstrual cycle and hormonal contraceptives on competitiveness,” Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, 83 (2012): 1-10. (Link)

2. Danel Dariusz, Boguslaw Pawlowski, “Attractiveness of men’s faces in relation to women’s phase of menstrual cycle,” Collegium Antropologicum, 30 (2006): 285-289. (Link)

Day 7

1. Nicolas Guéguen, “Makeup and Menstrual Cycle: Near Ovulation, Women Use More Cosmetics,” The Psychological Record, 62 (2012): 541-548. (Link)

2. BreastCancer.org/symptoms/testing/types/self_exam: retrieved April 10, 2019. (Link)

3. Dayse da Silva Souza, et al., “Variation in the Hearing Threshold in Women during the Menstrual Cycle,” International Archives of Otorhinolaryngology, 4 (2017): 323-328. (Link)

Day 8

1. Beverly G Reed, Bruce R Carr, “The Normal Menstrual Cycle and the Control of Ovulation,” Endotext, published online August 5, 2018. (Link)
Elizabeth A. Lenton, et al., “Normal variation in the length of the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle: effect of chronological age,” British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 91 (1984): 681-684. (Link)
Elizabeth A. Lenton, Britth-Marie Landgren, Lynne Sexton, “Normal variation in the length of the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle: identification of the short luteal phase,” British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 91 (1984): 685-689. (Link)

2. Khandis R. Blake, et al., “High estradiol and low progesterone are associated with high assertiveness in women,” Psychoneuroendocrinology, 75 (2017): 91-99. (Link)
Rosalind Brock, Georgina Rowse, Pauline Slade, “Relationships between paranoid thinking, self-esteem and the menstrual cycle,” Archives of Women’s Mental Health, 19 (2016): 271-279. (Link)
Annett Welz, et al. “Anxiety and rumination moderate menstrual cycle effects on mood in daily life,” Women & Health, 56 (2016): 540-560. (Link)
Kristina M. Durante, Norman P. Li, “Oestradiol level and opportunistic mating in women,” Biology Letters, 5 (2009): 179-182. (Link)
Susanne Röder, Gayle Brewer, Bernhard Fink, “Menstrual cycle shifts in women’s self-perception and motivation: A daily report method,” Personality and Individual Differences, 47 (2009): 616-619. (Link)
Pamela Warner, John Bancroft, “Mood, sexuality, oral contraceptives and the menstrual cycle,” Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 32 (1988): 417-427. (Link)
Aila Collins, Peter Eneroth, Brut‐Marie Landgren, “Psychoneuroendocrine stress responses and mood as related to the menstrual cycle,” Psychosomatic Medicine, 47 (1985): 512-527. (Link)

3. Kimberly Albert, Jens Pruessner, Paul Newhouse, “Estradiol levels modulate brain activity and negative responses to psychosocial stress across the menstrual cycle,” Psychoneuroendocrinology, 59 (2015): 14-24. (Link)

4. Jane L. Veith, et al., “Plasma beta-endorphin, pain thresholds and anxiety levels across the human menstrual cycle,” Physiology & Behavior, 32 (1984): 31-34. (Link)
Keith W. Vrbicky, et al., “Evidence for the involvement of beta-endorphin in the human menstrual cycle,” Fertility and Sterility, 38 (1982): 701-704. (Link)

5. Bronwyn M. Graham, Geena Shin, “Estradiol moderates the relationship between state-trait anxiety and attentional bias to threat in women,” Psychoneuroendocrinology, 93 (2018): 82-89. (Link)

6. Mario G. Oyola, Robert J. Handa, “Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axes: sex differences in regulation of stress responsivity,” Stress, 20 (2017): 476-494. (Link)
Crystal Edler Schiller, et al., “Reproductive Steroid Regulation of Mood and Behavior,” Comprehensive Physiology, 6 (2016): 1135-1160. (Link)
Rebecca M. Shansky, Genevieve Bender, A. F. T. Arnsten, “Estrogen prevents norepinephrine alpha-2a receptor reversal of stress-induced working memory impairment,” Stress, 12 (2009): 457-463. (Link)

7. AkinoriTasaka, et al., “Psychological stress-relieving effects of chewing – Relationship between masticatory function-related factors and stress-relieving effects,” Journal of Prosthodontic Research, 62 (2018): 50-55. (Link)
Kin-ya Kubo, Mitsuo Iinuma, Huayue Chen, “Mastication as a Stress-Coping Behavior,” BioMed Research International, 2015: published online May 18, 2015. (Link)
Kiyoshi Kamiya, et al., “Prolonged gum chewing evokes activation of the ventral part of prefrontal cortex and suppression of nociceptive responses: involvement of the serotonergic system,” Journal of Medical and Dental Sciences, 57 (2010): 35-43. (Link)

8. Liisa A.M. Galea, “Why estrogens matter for behavior and brain health,” Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, 76 (2017): 363-379. (Link)
Elizabeth Hampson, Erin E. Morley, “Estradiol concentrations and working memory performance in women of reproductive age,” Psychoneuroendocrinology, 38 (2013): 2897-2904. (Link)
Lauren Rosenberg, Sohee Park, “Verbal and spatial functions across the menstrual cycle in healthy young women,” Psychoneuroendocrinology, 27 (2002): 835-841. (Link)

9. Rosemarie Krug, et al., “Jealousy, general creativity, and coping with social frustration during the menstrual cycle,” Archives of Sexual Behavior, 25 (1996): 181-199. (Link)
Rosemarie Krug, et al., “Effects of menstrual cycle on creativity,” Psychoneuroendocrinology, 19 (1994): 21-31. (Link)

10. Silvia Solís-Ortiz, María Corsi-Cabrera, “Sustained attention is favored by progesterone during early luteal phase and visuo-spatial memory by estrogens during ovulatory phase in young women,” Psychoneuroendocrinology, 33 (2008): 989-998. (Link)
Silvia Solís-Ortiz, Miguel Ángel Guevara, María Corsi-Cabrera, “Performance in a test demanding prefrontal functions is favored by early luteal phase progesterone: an electroencephalographic study,” Psychoneuroendocrinology, 29 (2004): 1047-1057. (Link)

11. Jennifer M. George, Erik Dane, “Affect, emotion, and decision making,” Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 136 (2016): 47-55. (Link)
Esther K. Diekhof, Melanie Ratnayake, “Menstrual cycle phase modulates reward sensitivity and performance monitoring in young women: Preliminary fMRI evidence,” Neuropsychologia, 84 (2016): 70-80. (Link)

12. Gad Saad, Eric Stenstrom, “Calories, beauty, and ovulation: The effects of the menstrual cycle on food and appearance-related consumption,” Journal of Consumer Psychology, 22 (2012): 102-113. (Link)

13. Kristina M. Durante, et al., “Money, Status, and the Ovulatory Cycle,” Journal of Marketing Research, 51 (2014): 27-39. (Link)

14. Barnaby J. W. Dixon, et al., “The role of mating context and fecundability in women’s preferences for men’s facial masculinity and beardedness,” Psychoneuroendocrinology, 93 (2018): 90-102. (Link)
Kelly Gildersleeve, Martie G. Haselton, Melissa R. Fales, “Do women’s mate preferences change across the ovulatory cycle? A meta-analytic review,” Psychological Bulletin, 140 (2014): 1205-1259. (Link)
Inge Lens, et al., “Would male conspicuous consumption capture the female eye? Menstrual cycle effects on women’s attention to status products,” Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 48 (2012): 346-349. (Link)
Heather A. Rupp, et al., “Neural activation in women in response to masculinized male faces: mediation by hormones and psychosexual factors,” Evolution and Human Behavior, 30 (2009): 1-10. (Link)
Steven Gangestad, et al., “Changes in women’s mate preferences across the ovulatory cycle,” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 92 (2007): 151-163. (Link)
Anthony C. Little, Benedict C. Jones, Robert P. Burriss, “Preferences for masculinity in male bodies change across the menstrual cycle,” Hormones and Behavior, 51 (2007): 633-639. (Link)
Steven W. Gangestad, et al., “Women’s Preferences for Male Behavioral Displays Change Across the Menstrual Cycle,” Psychological Science, 15 (2004): 203-207. (Link)
Ian S. Penton-Voak, et al., “Menstrual cycle alters face preference,” Nature, 399 (1999): 741-742. (Link)

15. Aisha J .L. Munk, Aaron C. Zoeller, Juergen Hennig, “Fluctuations of estradiol during women’s menstrual cycle: Influences on reactivity towards erotic stimuli in the late positive potential,” Psychoneuroendocrinology, 91 (2018): 11-19. (Link)
James R. Roney, Zachary L. Simmons, “Hormonal predictors of sexual motivation in natural menstrual cycles,” Hormones and Behavior, 63 (2013): 636-645. (Link)
Paula Englander-Golden, et al. “Female sexual arousal and the menstrual cycle,” Journal of Human Stress, 6 (1980): 42-48. (Link)

16. Samantha J. Dawson, Kelly D. Suschinsky, Martin L. Lalumière, “Sexual Fantasies and Viewing Times Across the Menstrual Cycle: A Diary Study,” Archives of Sexual Behavior, 41 (2012): 173-183. (Link)

17. Masum Canat, et al., “Vitamin D3 deficiency is associated with female sexual dysfunction in premenopausal women,” International Urology and Nephrology, 48 (2016): 1789–1795. (Link)

18. Vitamin D: Fact Sheet for Health Professionals, National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements, retrieved online April 13, 2019. (Link)

19. David G. Hoel, Frank R. De Gruijl, “Sun Exposure Public Health Directives,” International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 15 (2018): 2794. (Link)
Maria-Antonia Serrano, et al., “Solar ultraviolet doses and vitamin D in a northern mid-latitude,” Science of the Total Environment, 574 (2017): 744-750. (Link)

20. Kelly Klump, et al., “Differential Effects of Estrogen and Progesterone on Genetic and Environmental Risk for Emotional Eating in Women,” Clinical Psychological Science, 4 (2016): 895-908. (Link)

21. Simone D. Herzberg, et al., “The Effect of Menstrual Cycle and Contraceptives on ACL Injuries and Laxity: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis,” Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, 7 (2017): published online July 21, 2017. (Link)
Vivek Balachandar, et al., “Effects of the menstrual cycle on lower-limb biomechanics, neuromuscular control, and anterior cruciate ligament injury risk: a systematic review,” Muscle, Ligaments and Tendons Journal, 1 (2017): 136-146. (Link)

22. JongEun Yim, Jerrold Petrofsky, Haneul Lee, “Correlation between Mechanical Properties of the Ankle Muscles and Postural Sway during the Menstrual Cycle,” The Tohoku Journal of Experimental Medicine, 244 (2018): 201-2017. (Link)
Haneul Lee, JongEun Yim, “Increased Postural Sway and Changes in the Neuromuscular Activities of the Ankle Stabilizing Muscles at Ovulation in Healthy Young Women,” The Tohoku Journal of Experimental Medicine, 240 (2016): 287-294. (Link)

23. Nikhat Fatima, et al., “Pain Perception and Anxiety Levels during Menstrual Cycle Associated with Periodontal Therapy,” International Journal of Dentistry, 2014: published online October 12, 2014. (Link)
Taraneh Rezaii, et al., “The influence of menstrual phases on pain modulation in healthy women,” The Journal of Pain, 13 (2012): 646-655.
Yannick Tousignant-Laflamme, Serge Marchand, “Excitatory and inhibitory pain mechanisms during the menstrual cycle in healthy women,” Pain, 146 (2009): 47-55. (Link)

24. Patrick Markey, Charlotte Markey, “Changes in women’s interpersonal styles across the menstrual cycle,” Journal of Research in Personality, 45 (2011): 493-499. (Link)

Day 9

1. Maicon Gonçalves Gabriel, et al., “Kundalini Yoga for Generalized Anxiety Disorder: An Exploration of Treatment Efficacy and Possible Mechanisms,” International Journal of Yoga Therapy, 28 (2018): 97-105. (Link)
Stefania Maria Dori, et al., “Anti-anxiety efficacy of Sudarshan Kriya Yoga in general anxiety disorder: A multicomponent, yoga based, breath intervention program for patients suffering from generalized anxiety disorder with or without comorbidities,” Journal of Affective Disorders, 184 (2015): 310-317. (Link)

2. Manoj Sharma, Taj Haider, “Tai chi as an alternative and complimentary therapy for anxiety: a systematic review,” Journal of Evidence-Based Complementary & Alternative Medicine, 20 (2015): 143-153. (Link)
Mei-Ying Chang, et al., “Associations between Tai Chi Chung program, anxiety, and cardiovascular risk factors,” American Journal of Health Promotion, 28 (2013): 16-22. (Link)

3. Elizabeth A. Hoge, et al., “The effect of mindfulness meditation training on biological acute stress responses in generalized anxiety disorder” Psychiatry Research, 262 (2018): 328-332. (Link)
Elizabeth A. Hoge, et al., “Randomized controlled trial of mindfulness meditation for generalized anxiety disorder: effects on anxiety and stress reactivity,” The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 74 (2013): 786-792. (Link)

4. Girija Kaimal, Kendra Ray, Juan Muniz, “Reduction of Cortisol Levels and Participants’ Responses Following Art Making,” Art Therapy, 33 (2016): 74-80. (Link)

5. Grant M.Ostrander, R. Nathan Pipitone, Melanie L. Shoup-Knox, “Interactions between observer and stimuli fertility status: Endocrine and perceptual responses to intrasexual vocal fertility cues,” Hormones and Behavior, 98 (2018): 191-197. (Link)
Hagit Shoffel-Havakuk, et al., “Menstrual Cycle, Vocal Performance, and Laryngeal Vascular Appearance: An Observational Study on 17 Subjects,” Journal of Voice, 32 (2018): 226-233. (Link)
Irena Pavela Banai, “Voice in different phases of menstrual cycle among naturally cycling women and users of hormonal contraceptives,” PLOS ONE, 12 (2018). (Link)
Öner Çelik, et al., “Voice and Speech Changes in Various Phases of Menstrual Cycle,” Journal of Voice, 27 (2013): 622-626. (Link)

6. Clarissa Behr Davis, Michael Lee Davis, “The effects of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) on the female singer,” Journal of Voice, 7 (1993): 337-353. (Link)

Day 10

1. Kayla M. Joyce, et al., “Retrospective and prospective assessments of gambling-related behaviors across the female menstrual cycle,” Journal of Behavioral Addictions, 8 (2019): 135-145. (Link)
Margery Lucas, Elissa Koff, “Fertile Women Discount the Future: Conception Risk and Impulsivity Are Independently Associated with Financial Decisions,” Evolutionary Psychological Science, 3 (2017): 261-269. (Link)
Janine Bayer, Pia Bandurski, Tobias Sommer, “Differential modulation of activity related to the anticipation of monetary gains and losses across the menstrual cycle,” European Journal of Neuroscience, 38 (2013): 3519-3526. (Link)

2. Olga Stavrova, Daniel Ehlebracht, “Cynical Beliefs about Human Nature and Income: Longitudinal and Cross-Cultural Analyses,” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 110 (2015): 116-132. (Link)
Ciro Conversano, et al., “Optimism and Its Impact on Mental and Physical Well-Being,” Clinical Practice & Epidemiology, 6 (2010): 25-29. (Link)
Lysann Damisch, Barbara Stoberock, Thomas Mussweiler, “Keep Your Fingers Crossed!: How Superstition Improves Performance,” Psychological Science, 21 (2010): 1014-1020. (Link)

3. Sonia K. Kang, et al., “Power Affects Performance When the Pressure Is On: Evidence for Low-Power Threat and High-Power Lift,” Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 41 (2015): 726-735. (Link)

4. Gina Paul, Barb Elam, Steven J. Verhulst, “A Longitudinal Study of Students’ Perceptions of Using Deep Breathing Meditation to Reduce Testing Stresses,” Teaching and Learning in Medicine, 19 (2006): 287-292. (Link)

5. Kayla M. Joyce, et al., “Retrospective and prospective assessments of gambling-related behaviors across the female menstrual cycle,” Journal of Behavioral Addictions, 8 (2019): 135-145. (Link)
Margery Lucas, Elissa Koff, “Fertile Women Discount the Future: Conception Risk and Impulsivity Are Independently Associated with Financial Decisions,” Evolutionary Psychological Science, 3 (2017): 261-269. (Link)
Stephanie C. Lazzaro, et al., “The Impact of Menstrual Cycle Phase on Economic Choice and Rationality,” PLOS ONE, 11 (2016): published online January 29, 2016. (Link)
Janine Bayer, Pia Bandurski, Tobias Sommer, “Differential modulation of activity related to the anticipation of monetary gains and losses across the menstrual cycle,” European Journal of Neuroscience, 38 (2013): 3519-3526. (Link)
Matthew Pearson, Burkhard C. Schipper, “Menstrual cycle and competitive bidding,” Games and Economic Behavior, 78 (2013): 1-20. (Link)

6. Elizabeth Hampson, Doreen Kimura, “Reciprocal effects of hormonal fluctuations on human motor and perceptual-spatial skills,” Behavioral Neuroscience, 102 (1988): 456-459. (Link)
“Women’s skills linked to estrogen levels,” Science News, November 26, 1988, retrieved online from The Free Library April 3, 2019. (Link)
“Female Sex Hormone Is Tied To Ability to Perform Tasks,” The New York Times, November 18, 1988, A00001. (Link)

Day 11

1. Elizabeth Anderson, Geetha Shivakumar, “Effects of Exercise and Physical Activity on Anxiety,” Frontiers in Psychiatry, 4 (2013): published online April 23, 2013. (Link)

2. Yukihiro Yada, et al., “Overseas Survey of the Effect of Cedrol on the Autonomic Nervous System in Three Countries,” Journal of Physiological Anthropology, 26 (2007): 349-354. (Link)

3. Suzanne J. Einöther, Vanessa E. Martens, “Acute effects of tea consumption on attention and mood,” The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 98 (2013): 1700S-1708S. (Link)

4. Kristina M. Durante, Ashley Rae Arsena, “Playing the Field: The Effect of Fertility on Women’s Desire for Variety,” Journal of Consumer Research, 41 (2015): 1372-1391. (Link)

5. Elena Morotti, et al., “Clitoral changes, sexuality, and body image during the menstrual cycle: a pilot study,” The Journal of Sexual Medicine, 10 (2013): 1320-1327. (Link)

6. Nataša Šimić, Arijana Ravlić, “Changes in basal body temperature and simple reaction times during the menstrual cycle,” Archives of Industrial Hygeine and Toxicology, 64 (2013): 99-106. (Link)
Sunil Kumar, Mehak Mufti, Ravikiran Kisan, “Variation of Reaction Time in Different Phases of Menstrual Cycle,” Journal of Clinical & Diagnostic Research, 7 (2013): 1604-1605. (Link)

Day 12

1. Ai Yoto, et al., “Black tea aroma inhibited increase of salivary chromogranin-A after arithmetic tasks,” Journal of Physiological Anthropology, 37 (2018): 3. (Link)

2. Liselot Hudders, et al., “The Rival Wears Prada: Luxury Consumption as a Female Competition Strategy,” Evolutionary Psychology, 3 (2014): 570-587. (Link)

3. Kristina M. Durante, Norman P. Li, Martie G. Haselton, “Changes in Women’s Choice of Dress Across the Ovulatory Cycle: Naturalistic and Laboratory Task-Based Evidence,” Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 34 (2008): 1451-1460. (Link)

4. Ruban C. Arslan, et al., “Using 26,000 diary entries to show ovulatory changes in sexual desire and behavior,” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, published online August 27, 2018. (Link)
Nicholas M. Grebe, Melissa Emery Thompson, Steven W. Gangestad, “Hormonal predictors of women’s extra-pair vs. in-pair sexual attraction in natural cycles: Implications for extended sexuality,” Hormones and Behavior, 78 (2016): 211-219. (Link)

5. Allison G. Harvey, Suzanna Payne, “The management of unwanted pre-sleep thoughts in insomnia: distraction with imagery versus general distraction,” Behaviour Research and Therapy, 40 (2002): 267-277. (Link)

6. Georgina Cheng, Kathleen M. Yeater, Lois L. Hoyer, “Cellular and Molecular Biology of Candida albicans Estrogen Response,” Eukaryotic Cell, 5 (2006): 180-191. (Link)
Paul L. Fidel, Jr., Jessica Cutright, Chad Steele, “Effects of Reproductive Hormones on Experimental Vaginal Candidiasis,” Infection and Immunity, 68 (2000): 651-657. (Link)

7. Eileen Hilton, et al., “Ingestion of Yogurt Containing Lactobacillus acidophilus as Prophylaxis for Candidal Vaginitis,” Annals of Internal Medicine, 116 (1992): 353-357. (Link)

8. Cengiz Kirmaz, et al., “Is the menstrual cycle affecting the skin prick test reactivity?” Asian Pacific Journal of Allergy and Immunology, 22 (2004): 197-203. (Link)
Anna Haeggström, et al., “Nasal mucosal swelling and reactivity during a menstrual cycle,” ORL, 62 (2000): 39-42. (Link)
Dimitris Kalogeromitros, et al., “Influence of the menstrual cycle on skin-prick test reactions to histamine, morphine and allergen,” Clinical and Experimental Allergy, 25 (1995): 461-466. (Link)

9. Carl Philpott, Maher Akram El-Alami, George M. Murty, “The effect of the steroid sex hormones on the nasal airway during the normal menstrual cycle,” Clinical Otolaryngology and Allied Sciences, 29 (2004): 138-142. (Link)

10. Robert L. Matchok, et al., “Susceptibility to Nausea and Motion Sickness as a Function of the Menstrual Cycle,” Women’s Health Issues, 18 (2008): 328-335. (Link)

Day 13

1. Kayla M. Joyce, et al., “Retrospective and prospective assessments of gambling-related behaviors across the female menstrual cycle,” Journal of Behavioral Addictions, 8 (2019): 135-145. (Link)
Annett Welz, et al. “Anxiety and rumination moderate menstrual cycle effects on mood in daily life,” Women & Health, 56 (2016): 540-560. (Link)

2. Sarah S. M. Townsend, Heejung S. Kim, Batja Mesquita, “Are You Feeling What I’m Feeling? Emotional Similarity Buffers Stress,” Social Psychological and Personality Science, 5 (2013): 526-533. (Link)

3. Joseph F. Salvatore, et al., “Strangers With Benefits: Attraction to Outgroup Men Increases as Fertility Increases Across the Menstrual Cycle,” Personality & Social Psychology Bulletin, 43 (2017): 204-217. (Link)

4. Martie G. Haselton, Geoffrey F. Miller, “Women’s fertility across the cycle increases the short-term attractiveness of creative intelligence compared to wealth,” Human Nature, 17 (2006): 50-73. (Link)

5. David C. Geary, et al., “Estrogens and relationship jealousy,” Human Nature, 12 (2001): 299-320. (Link)
Rosemarie Krug, et al., “Jealousy, general creativity, and coping with social frustration during the menstrual cycle,” Archives of Sexual Behavior, 25 (1996): 181-199. (Link)

6. James R. Roney, Zachary L. Simmons, “Ovarian hormone fluctuations predict within-cycle shifts in women’s food intake,” Hormones and Behavior, 90 (2017): 8-14. (Link)
Louise Dye, John Blundell, “Menstrual cycle and appetite control: implications for weight regulation,” Human Reproduction, 12 (1997): 1142-1151. (Link)

7. Kelly A. Gildersleeve, et al., “Body odor attractiveness as a cue of impending ovulation in women: evidence from a study using hormone-confirmed ovulation,” Hormones and Behavior, 61 (2012): 157-166. (Link)
Devendra Singh, Matthew Bronstad, “Female body odour is a potential cue to ovulation,” Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 268 (2001): 797-801. (Link)

8. John T. Manning, et al., “Asymmetry and the menstrual cycle in women,” Ethology and Social Biology, 17 (1996): 129-143. (Link)
Diane Scutt, John T. Manning, “Ovary and ovulation: Symmetry and ovulation in women,” Human Reproduction, 11 (1996): 2477-2480. (Link)
Slawomir Koziel, et al., “Is Increased Facial Asymmetry Associated With The Use Of Hormonal Contraceptive Among Polish Young Women In Wroclaw?” Collegium Antropologicum, 41 (2017): 39-43. (Link)
Elisabeth Oberzaucher, “The myth of hidden ovulation: Shape and texture changes in the face during the menstrual cycle,” Journal of Evolutionary Psychology, 10 (2012): 163-175. (Link)
S. Craig Roberts, et al., “Female facial attractiveness increases during the fertile phase of the menstrual cycle,” Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 271 (2004): S270-S272. (Link)

9. Anthony O. Marinho, et al., “Ovulation side and occurrence of mittelschmerz in spontaneous and induced ovarian cycles,” BMJ, 284 (1982): 632. (Link)
Lucy E. Hann, et al., “Mittelschmerz. Sonographic demonstration,” JAMA, 241 (1979): 2731-2732. (Link)

10. Diana Armbruster, et al., “The impact of sex and menstrual cycle on the acoustic startle response,” Behavioural Brain Research, 1 (2014): 326-333. (Link)

11. Jessica L. Tracy, Alec T. Beall, “The impact of weather on women’s tendency to wear red or pink when at high risk for conception,” PLOS ONE, 9 (2014): e88852. (Link)
Jessica L. Tracy, Alec T. Beall, “Women are more likely to wear red or pink at peak fertility,” Psychological Science, 9 (2013): 1837-1841. (Link)

Day 14

1. Andrea Salonia, et al., “Menstrual cycle-related changes in circulating androgens in healthy women with self-reported normal sexual function,” The Journal of Sexual Medicine, 5 (2008): 854-863. (Link)

2. Emily D. Hooker, Belinda Campos, Sarah D. Pressman, “It just takes a text: Partner text messages can reduce cardiovascular responses to stress in females,” Computers in Human Behavior, 84 (2018): 485-492. (Link)

3. Jeff Kiesner, “One woman’s low is another woman’s high: Paradoxical effects of the menstrual cycle,” Psychoneuroendocrinology, 36 (2011): 68-76. (Link)

4. Peter J. Rogers, et al., “Association of the Anxiogenic and Alerting Effects of Caffeine with ADORA2A and ADORA1 Polymorphisms and Habitual Level of Caffeine Consumption,” Neuropyschopharmacology, 35 (2010): 1973-1983. (Link)

5. G. Giuffrè, L. Di Rosa, F. Fiorino, “Changes in colour discrimination during the menstrual cycle,” Ophthalmologica, 1 (2007): 47-50. (Link)

Day 15

1. Beverly G Reed, Bruce R Carr, “The Normal Menstrual Cycle and the Control of Ovulation,” Endotext, published online August 5, 2018.
Elizabeth A. Lenton, et al., “Normal variation in the length of the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle: effect of chronological age,” British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 91 (1984): 681-684. (Link)
Elizabeth A. Lenton, Britth-Marie Landgren, Lynne Sexton, “Normal variation in the length of the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle: identification of the short luteal phase,” British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 91 (1984): 685-689. (Link)

2. Annett Welz, et al. “Anxiety and rumination moderate menstrual cycle effects on mood in daily life,” Women & Health, 56 (2016): 540-560. (Link)
Doodipala S. Reddy, Bert W. O’Malley, Michael A.Rogawski, “Anxiolytic activity of progesterone in progesterone receptor knockout mice,” Neuropharmacology, 48 (2005): 14-24. (Link)
Cheryl A. Frye, Alicia A. Walf, “Estrogen and/or progesterone administered systemically or to the amygdala can have anxiety-, fear-, and pain-reducing effects in ovariectomized rats,” Behavioral Neuroscience, 118 (2004): 306-313. (Link)
Daniel Bitran, Robert H. Purdy, Carol K. Kellog, “Anxiolytic effect of progesterone is associated with increases in cortical allopregnanolone and GABAA receptor function,” Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, 45 (1993): 423-428. (Link)
Ellen Freeman, et al., “Anxiolytic metabolites of progesterone: correlation with mood and performance measures following oral progesterone administration to healthy female volunteers,” Neuroendocrinology, 58 (1993): 478-84. (Link)
Aila Collins, Peter Eneroth, Brut‐Marie Landgren, “Psychoneuroendocrine stress responses and mood as related to the menstrual cycle,” Psychosomatic Medicine, 47 (1985): 512-527. (Link)

3. Torbjörn Bäckström, et al., “Paradoxical effects of GABA-A modulators may explain sex steroid induced negative mood symptoms in some persons,” Neuroscience, 15 (2011): 46-54. (Link)

4. Bethany R. Lusk, et al., “Women in the midluteal phase of the menstrual cycle have difficulty suppressing the processing of negative emotional stimuli: An event-related potential study,” Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience, 17 (2017): 886-903. (Link)

5. Safar Zarei, Leili Mosalanejad, Mohamed Amin Ghobadifar, “Blood glucose levels, insulin concentrations, and insulin resistance in healthy women and women with premenstrual syndrome: a comparative study,” Clinical and Experimental Reproductive Medicine, 40 (2013): 76-82. (Link)
Michael P. Diamond, Donald C. Simonson, Ralph A. DeFronzo, “Menstrual cyclicity has a profound effect on glucose homeostasis,” Fertility and Sterility, 52 (1989): 204-208. (Link)

6. Liisa Hantsoo, C. Neill Epperson, “Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder: Epidemiology and Treatment,” Current Psychiatry Reports, 17 (2015): 87. (Link)

7. Catherine S. Symonds, et al., “Effects of the menstrual cycle on mood, neurocognitive and neuroendocrine function in healthy premenopausal women,” Psychological Medicine, 34 (2004): 93-102. (Link)
Daniel Bitran, Robert H. Purdy, Carol K. Kellog, “Anxiolytic effect of progesterone is associated with increases in cortical allopregnanolone and GABAA receptor function,” Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, 45 (1993): 423-428. (Link)
Ellen Freeman, et al., “Anxiolytic metabolites of progesterone: correlation with mood and performance measures following oral progesterone administration to healthy female volunteers,” Neuroendocrinology, 58 (1993): 478-84. (Link)

8. Silvia Solís-Ortiz, María Corsi-Cabrera, “Sustained attention is favored by progesterone during early luteal phase and visuo-spatial memory by estrogens during ovulatory phase in young women,” Psychoneuroendocrinology, 33 (2008): 989-998. (Link)
Silvia Solís-Ortiz, Miguel Ángel Guevara, María Corsi-Cabrera, “Performance in a test demanding prefrontal functions is favored by early luteal phase progesterone: an electroencephalographic study,” Psychoneuroendocrinology, 29 (2004): 1047-1057. (Link)

9. Crystal Haskell-Ramsay, et al., “Cognitive and mood improvements following acute supplementation with purple grape juice in healthy young adults,” European Journal of Nutrition, 56 (2017): 2621-2631. (Link)

10. Anthony Watson, et al., “The impact of blackcurrant juice on attention, mood and brain wave spectral activity in young healthy volunteers,” Nutritional Neuroscience, published online January 17, 2018. (Link)

11. Doodipala S. Reddy, Bert W. O’Malley, Michael A.Rogawski, “Anxiolytic activity of progesterone in progesterone receptor knockout mice,” Neuropharmacology, 48 (2005): 14-24.
Daniel Bitran, Robert H. Purdy, Carol K. Kellog, “Anxiolytic effect of progesterone is associated with increases in cortical allopregnanolone and GABAA receptor function,” Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, 45 (1993): 423-428. (Link)
Ellen Freeman, et al., “Anxiolytic metabolites of progesterone: correlation with mood and performance measures following oral progesterone administration to healthy female volunteers,” Neuroendocrinology, 58 (1993): 478-84. (Link)

12. Derek D. Randolph, Patrick J. O’Connor, “Stair walking is more energizing than low dose caffeine in sleep deprived young women,” Physiology & Behavior, 174 (2017): 128-135. (Link)

13. Gad Saad, Eric Stenstrom, “Calories, beauty, and ovulation: The effects of the menstrual cycle on food and appearance-related consumption,” Journal of Consumer Psychology, 22 (2012): 102-113. (Link)

14. Eric Pierre Stenstrom, “Changes in women’s consumption preferences and behaviors across the menstrual cycle,” Masters Thesis, Concordia University, December 2007. (Link)

15. Sachi Nandan Mohanty, Damodar Suar, “Decision making under uncertainty and information processing in positive and negative mood states,” Psychological Reports, 115 (2014): 91-105. (Link)

16. Barnaby J. W. Dixon, et al., “The role of mating context and fecundability in women’s preferences for men’s facial masculinity and beardedness,” Psychoneuroendocrinology, 93 (2018): 90-102. (Link)
Kelly Gildersleeve, Martie G. Haselton, Melissa R. Fales, “Do women’s mate preferences change across the ovulatory cycle? A meta-analytic review,” Psychological Bulletin, 140 (2014): 1205-1259. (Link)
Benedict C. Jones, et al., “Commitment to relationships and preferences for femininity and apparent health in faces are strongest on days of the menstrual cycle when progesterone level is high,” Hormones and Behavior, 48 (2005): 283-290. (Link)
Ian S. Penton-Voak, et al., “Menstrual cycle alters face preference,” Nature, 399 (1999): 741-742. (Link)

17. Nicholas M. Grebe, Melissa Emery Thompson, Steven W. Gangestad, “Hormonal predictors of women’s extra-pair vs. in-pair sexual attraction in natural cycles: Implications for extended sexuality,” Hormones and Behavior, 78 (2016): 211-219. (Link)
Benedict C. Jones, et al., “Commitment to relationships and preferences for femininity and apparent health in faces are strongest on days of the menstrual cycle when progesterone level is high,” Hormones and Behavior, 48 (2005): 283-290. (Link)

18. James R. Roney, Zachary L. Simmons, “Hormonal predictors of sexual motivation in natural menstrual cycles,” Hormones and Behavior, 63 (2013): 636-645. (Link)
Paula Englander-Golden, et al. “Female sexual arousal and the menstrual cycle,” Journal of Human Stress, 6 (1980): 42-48. (Link)

19. Lisa M. DeBruine, Benedict C. Jones, David I. Perrett, “Women’s attractiveness judgments of self-resembling faces change across the menstrual cycle,” Hormones and Behavior, 47 (2005): 379-383. (Link)

20. Anna M. Gorczyca, et al., “Changes in macronutrient, micronutrient, and food group intakes throughout the menstrual cycle in healthy, premenopausal women,” European Journal of Nutrition, 55 (2016): 1181-1188. (Link)
Peter C. Butera, “Estradiol and the control of food intake,” Physiology & Behavior, 99 (2010): 175-180. (Link)
Louise Dye, John Blundell, “Menstrual cycle and appetite control: implications for weight regulation,” Human Reproduction, 12 (1997): 1142-1151. (Link)
Susan L. Barr, K. Christina Janelle, Jerilynn C. Prior, “Energy intakes are higher during the luteal phase of ovulatory menstrual cycles,” The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 61 (1995): 39-43. (Link)
William G. Johnson, “Energy regulation over the menstrual cycle,” Physiology & Behavior, 56 (1994): 523-527. (Link)

21. Anna M. Gorczyca, et al., “Changes in macronutrient, micronutrient, and food group intakes throughout the menstrual cycle in healthy, premenopausal women,” European Journal of Nutrition, 55 (2016): 1181-1188. (Link)

22. Anna M. Gorczyca, et al., “Changes in macronutrient, micronutrient, and food group intakes throughout the menstrual cycle in healthy, premenopausal women,” European Journal of Nutrition, 55 (2016): 1181-1188. (Link)
Punam Verma, et al. “Salt preference across phases of menstrual cycle,” Indian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology, 49 (2005): 99-102. (Link)

23. Jessica McNeil, et al., “Greater overall olfactory performance, explicit wanting for high fat foods and lipid intake during the mid-luteal phase of the menstrual cycle,” Physiology & Behavior, 112-113 (2013): 84-89. (Link)
William G. Johnson, “Energy regulation over the menstrual cycle,” Physiology & Behavior, 56 (1994): 523-527. (Link)

24. Adalberta Alberti-Fidanza, Daniela Fruttini, Maurizio Servili, “Gustatory and food habit changes during the menstrual cycle,” International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research, 68 (1998): 149-153. (Link)
Thoa Thi Than, Eugene R. Delay, Martin E. Maier, “Sucrose threshold variation during the menstrual cycle,” Physiology & Behavior, 56 (1994): 237-239. (Link)

25. Michael P. Diamond, Donald C. Simonson, Ralph A. DeFronzo, “Menstrual cyclicity has a profound effect on glucose homeostasis,” Fertility and Sterility, 52 (1989): 204-208. (Link)

26. Kelly Klump, et al., “Differential Effects of Estrogen and Progesterone on Genetic and Environmental Risk for Emotional Eating in Women,” Clinical Psychological Science, 4 (2016): 895-908. (Link)
Kelly Klump, et al., “Changes in genetic risk for emotional eating across the menstrual cycle: a longitudinal study,” Psychological Medicine, 45 (2015): 3227-3237. (Link)

27. Jodi D. Stookey, et al., “Drinking water is associated with weight loss in overweight dieting women independent of diet and activity,” Obesity, 16 (2008): 2481-2488. (Link)

28. Doodipala S. Reddy, Bert W. O’Malley, Michael A.Rogawski, “Anxiolytic activity of progesterone in progesterone receptor knockout mice,” Neuropharmacology, 48 (2005): 14-24. (Link)
Daniel Bitran, Robert H. Purdy, Carol K. Kellog, “Anxiolytic effect of progesterone is associated with increases in cortical allopregnanolone and GABAA receptor function,” Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, 45 (1993): 423-428. (Link)
Ellen Freeman, et al., “Anxiolytic metabolites of progesterone: correlation with mood and performance measures following oral progesterone administration to healthy female volunteers,” Neuroendocrinology, 58 (1993): 478-84. (Link)

29. Nina RW Geiker, et al., “A weight-loss program adapted to the menstrual cycle increases weight loss in healthy, overweight, premenopausal women: a 6-mo randomized controlled trial,” The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 104 (2016): 15-20. (Link)
Leanne M. Redman, Garry C. Scroop, Robert J. Norman, “Impact of menstrual cycle phase on the exercise status of young, sedentary women,” European Journal of Applied Physiology, 90 (2003): 505-513. (Link)

30. Leanne M. Redman, Garry C. Scroop, Robert J. Norman, “Impact of menstrual cycle phase on the exercise status of young, sedentary women,” European Journal of Applied Physiology, 90 (2003): 505-513. (Link)
Barbara J. Nicklas, Anthony C. Hackney, Rick .L Sharp, “The Menstrual Cycle and Exercise: Performance, Muscle Glycogen, and Substrate Responses,” International Journal of Sports Medicine, 10 (1989): 264-269. (Link)

31. Haneul Lee, et al, “Higher Sweating Rate and Skin Blood Flow during the Luteal Phase of the Menstrual Cycle,” The Tohoku Journal of Experimental Medicine, 234 (2014): 117-122. (Link)
Xanne A. K. Janse de Jonge, et al., “Exercise Performance over the Menstrual Cycle in Temperate and Hot, Humid Conditions,” Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 44 (2012): 2190-2198. (Link)
Adolfo M. Garcia, et al., “Luteal phase of the menstrual cycle increases sweating rate during exercise,” Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research, 39 (2006): 1255-1261. (Link)
Yoshimitsu Inoue, et al., “Sex- and menstrual cycle-related differences in sweating and cutaneous blood flow in response to passive heat exposure,” European Journal of Applied Physiology, 94 (2005): 323-332. (Link)
Xanne A. K. Janse de Jonge, “Effects of the menstrual cycle on exercise performance,” Sports Medicine, 33 (2003): 833-851. (Link)

32. Hye-Kyung Jung, Doe-Young Kim, Il-Hwan Moon, “Effects of Gender and Menstrual Cycle on Colonic Transit Time in Healthy Subjects,” Korean Journal of Internal Medicine, 18 (2003): 181-186. (Link)
Michael I. McBurney, “Starch malabsorption and stool excretion are influenced by the menstrual cycle in women consuming low-fibre Western diets,” Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, 26 (1991): 880-886. (Link)
Arnold Wald, et al., “Gastrointestinal transit: the effect of the menstrual cycle,” Gastroenterology, 80 (1981): 1497-1500. (Link)

33. Antonella Amato, Rosa Liotta, Flavia Mulè, “Effects of menthol on circular smooth muscle of human colon: analysis of the mechanism of action,” European Journal of Pharmacology, 740 (2014): 295-301. (Link)

34. Sawsan Ibrahim Kreydiyyeh, “Diuretic effect and mechanism of action of parsley,” Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 79 (2002): 353-357. (Link)

35. Maha S. A. Abdel Hadi, “Sports Brassiere: Is It a Solution for Mastalgia,” The Breast Journal, 6 (2000): 407-409. (Link)
M. C. Wilson MC, R. A. Sellwood, “Therapeutic value of a supporting brassière in mastodynia,” BMJ, 2 (1976): 90. (Link)

36. Ksenija Cankar, Mark Music, Zare Finderle, “Cutaneous microvascular response during local cold exposure – the effect of female sex hormones and cold perception,” Microvascular Research, 108 (2016): 34-40. (Link)
Hee Eun Kim, Tokura Hiromi, “Effects of the menstrual cycle on dressing behavior in the cold,” Physiology & Behavior, 58 (1995): 699-703. (Link)

37. Jessica McNeil, et al., “Greater overall olfactory performance, explicit wanting for high fat foods and lipid intake during the mid-luteal phase of the menstrual cycle,” Physiology & Behavior, 112-113 (2013): 84-89. (Link)

Day 16

1. Jennifer M. George, Erik Dane, “Affect, emotion, and decision making,” Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 136 (2016): 47-55. (Link)

2. Eric P. Stenstrom, Gad Saad, Sean T. Hingston, “Menstrual cycle effects on prosocial orientation, gift giving, and charitable giving,” Journal of Business Research, 84 (2018): 82-88. (Link)

3. Eric P. Stenstrom, Gad Saad, Sean T. Hingston, “Menstrual cycle effects on prosocial orientation, gift giving, and charitable giving,” Journal of Business Research, 84 (2018): 82-88. (Link)

4. Eric P. Stenstrom, Gad Saad, Sean T. Hingston, “Menstrual cycle effects on prosocial orientation, gift giving, and charitable giving,” Journal of Business Research, 84 (2018): 82-88. (Link)

5. Everett E. Logue, et al., “Longitudinal Relationship between Elapsed Time in the Action Stages of Change and Weight Loss,” Obesity, 12 (2004): 1499-1508. (Link)

6. Farideh Vaziri, et al., “Comparing the Effects of Dietary Flaxseed and Omega-3 Fatty Acids Supplement on Cyclical Mastalgia in Iranian Women: A Randomized Clinical Trial,” International Journal of Family Medicine, (2014): published online August 13, 2014. (Link)

7. Bethany R. Lusk, “Early visual processing is enhanced in the midluteal phase of the menstrual cycle,” Psychoneuroendocrinology, 62 (2015): 343-351. (Link)
Nobuo Masataka, Masahiro Shibasaki, “Premenstrual enhancement of snake detection in visual search in healthy women,” Scientific Reports, 2 (2012): Published online March 8, 2012. (Link)

Day 17

1. Janine M. Dutcher, et al., “Self-Affirmation Activates the Ventral Striatum: A Possible Reward-Related Mechanism for Self-Affirmation,” Psychological Science, 27 (2016): 455-466. (Link)
Philip A. Powell, Jane Simpson, Paul G. Overton, “Self-affirming trait kindness regulates disgust toward one’s physical appearance,” Body Image, 12 (2015): 98-107. (Link)

2. Maria L. Loureiro, Steven T. Yen, Rodolfo M. Nayga, Jr., “The effects of nutritional labels on obesity,” Agricultural Economics, 43 (2012): 333-342. (Link)

3. Norman F. Boyd, et al., “Effect of a low-fat high-carbohydrate diet on symptoms of cyclical mastopathy,” The Lancet, 16 (1988): 128-132. (Link)

4. Daniel T. C. Cox, et al., “Doses of Nearby Nature Simultaneously Associated with Multiple Health Benefits,” International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 14 (2017): 172. (Link)
Margaret M. Hansen, Reo Jones, Kirsten Tocchini, “Shinrin-Yoku (Forest Bathing) and Nature Therapy: A State-of-the-Art Review,” International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 14 (2017): 851.

5. Shu-Feng Hsieh, Li-Ling Shen, Shan-Yu Sub. “Tongue color changes within a menstrual cycle in eumenorrheic women,” Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine, 6 (2016): 269-274. (Link)

Day 18

1. Javier T. Gonzalez, et al., “Calcium Ingestion Suppresses Appetite and Produces Acute Overcompensation of Energy Intake Independent of Protein in Healthy Adults,” The Journal of Nutrition, 145 (2015): 476-482. (Link)

2. Katy Vincent, et al., “’Luteal Analgesia’: Progesterone Dissociates Pain Intensity and Unpleasantness by Influencing Emotion Regulation Networks,” Frontiers in Endocrinology, 9 (2018): published online July 23, 2018. (Link)

3. H. Fox, et al., “Are patients with mastalgia anxious, and does relaxation therapy help?” The Breast, 6 (1997): 138-142. (Link)

4. Diana S. Fleischman, Daniel M.T. Fessler, “Progesterone’s effects on the psychology of disease avoidance: Support for the compensatory behavioral prophylaxis hypothesis,” Hormones and Behavior, 59 (2011): 271-275. (Link)

Day 19

1. Carolyn Dunn, et al., “Mindfulness Approaches and Weight Loss, Weight Maintenance, and Weight Regain,” Current Obesity Reports, 7 (2018): 37-49.

2. Andrea Scheuringer, Belinda Pletzer, “Sex Differences and Menstrual Cycle Dependent Changes in Cognitive Strategies during Spatial Navigation and Verbal Fluency,” Frontiers in Psychology, 8 (2017): 271-275.

Day 20

1. Patrícia Teixeira, et al., “Salt Preferences of Normotensive and Hypertensive Older Individuals,” The Journal of Clinical Hypertension, 16 (2014): 587-590. (Link)
Jéssica F. Rodrigues, “Elaboration of garlic and salt spice with reduced sodium intake,” Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências, 86 (2014): 2065-2075. (Link)

2. Rung-Chi Li, Kathleen M. Buchheit, Jonathan A. Bernstein, “Progestogen Hypersensitivity,” Current Allergy and Asthma Reports, 18 (2018): published online January 19, 2018. (Link)
Kathleen M. Buchheit, Jonathan A. Bernstein, “Progestogen Hypersensitivity: Heterogeneous Manifestations with a Common Trigger,” The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice, 5 (2017): 566-574. (Link)
Dinah Foer, Kathleen M. Buchheit, “Progestogen Hypersensitivity: An Evidence-Based Approach to Diagnosis and Management in Clinical Practice,” Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America, 37 (2017): 773-784. (Link)
Dinah Foer, et al., “Progestogen Hypersensitivity in 24 Cases: Diagnosis, Management, and Proposed Renaming and Classification,” The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice, 4 (2016): 723-729. (Link)

3. Agnieszka Żelaźniewicz, et al., “The progesterone level, leukocyte count and disgust sensitivity across the menstrual cycle,” Physiology & Behavior, 161 (2016): 60-65. (Link)
Diana S. Fleischman, Daniel M.T. Fessler, “Progesterone’s effects on the psychology of disease avoidance: Support for the compensatory behavioral prophylaxis hypothesis,” Hormones and Behavior, 59 (2011): 271-275. (Link)

Day 21

1. Jackie Andrade, et al., “Use of a clay modeling task to reduce chocolate craving,” Appetite, 58 (2012): 955-963. (Link)

2. Belinda Pletzer, Ourania Petasis, Larry Cahill, “Switching between forest and trees: opposite relationship of progesterone and testosterone to global-local processing,” Hormones and Behavior, 66 (2014): 257-266. (Link)

Day 22

1. News release: Obesity Society, “Thinking About the Long-Term Impact of Your Food Choices May Help Control Food Cravings,” Newswise.com/articles/thinking-about-the-long-term-impact-of-your-food-choices-may-help-control-food-cravings, November 4, 2014. (Link)

2. Stephanie L. Brown, et al., “Social Closeness Increases Salivary Progesterone in Humans,” Hormones and Behavior, 56 (2009): 108-111. (Link)

3. Oliver C.Schultheiss, Michelle M.Wirth, Steven J.Stanton, “Effects of affiliation and power motivation arousal on salivary progesterone and testosterone,” Hormones and Behavior, 46 (2004): 592-599.

Day 23

1. Rosalind Brock, Georgina Rowse, Pauline Slade, “Relationships between paranoid thinking, self-esteem and the menstrual cycle,” Archives of Women’s Mental Health, 19 (2016): 271-279. (Link)
Gerald Matthews, Helen Ryan, “The expression of the ‘pre-menstrual syndrome’ in measures of mood and sustained attention,” Ergonomics, 37 (1994): 1407-1417. (Link)
Pamela Warner, John Bancroft, “Mood, sexuality, oral contraceptives and the menstrual cycle,” Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 32 (1988): 417-427. (Link)
Aila Collins, Peter Eneroth, Brut‐Marie Landgren, “Psychoneuroendocrine stress responses and mood as related to the menstrual cycle,” Psychosomatic Medicine, 47 (1985): 512-527. (Link)

2. Kimberly Albert, Jens Pruessner, Paul Newhouse, “Estradiol levels modulate brain activity and negative responses to psychosocial stress across the menstrual cycle,” Psychoneuroendocrinology, 59 (2015): 14-24. (Link)

3. Kimberly Ann Yonkers, P. M. Shaughn O’Brien, Elias Eriksson, “Premenstrual syndrome,” The Lancet, 371 (2008): 1200-1210. (Link)

4. Annett Welz, et al. “Anxiety and rumination moderate menstrual cycle effects on mood in daily life,” Women & Health, 56 (2016): 540-560. (Link)

5. Tamaki Matsumoto, Hiroyuki Asakura, Tatsuya Hayashi, “Does lavender aromatherapy alleviate premenstrual emotional symptoms?: a randomized crossover trial,” BioPsychoSocial Medicine, 7 (2013): published online May 31, 2013. (Link)

6. Tapanee Hongratanaworakit, “Relaxing effect of rose oil on humans,” Natural Product Communications, 4 (2009): 291-296. (Link)

7. Tamaki Matsumoto, Tetsuya Kimura, Tatsuya Hayashi, “Does Japanese Citrus Fruit Yuzu (Citrus junos Sieb. ex Tanaka) Fragrance Have Lavender-Like Therapeutic Effects That Alleviate Premenstrual Emotional Symptoms? A Single-Blind Randomized Crossover Study,” Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 23 (2017): published online June 1, 2017. (Link)
Tamaki Matsumoto, Tetsuya Kimura, Tatsuya Hayashi, “Aromatic effects of a Japanese citrus fruit—yuzu (Citrus junos Sieb. ex Tanaka)—on psychoemotional states and autonomic nervous system activity during the menstrual cycle: a single-blind randomized controlled crossover study,” BioPsychoSocial Medicine, published online April 21, 2016. (Link)

8. M. Altmann, E. Knowles, H. D. Bull, “A psychosomatic study of the sex cycle in women,” Psychosomatic Medicine, 3 (1941): 199-224. (Link)

9. M. Altmann, E. Knowles, H. D. Bull, “A psychosomatic study of the sex cycle in women,” Psychosomatic Medicine, 3 (1941): 199-224. (Link)

10. Karen J. Pine, Ben C. Fletcher, “Women’s spending behaviour is menstrual-cycle sensitive,” Personality and Individual Differences, 50 (2011): 74-78. (Link)

11. Richard C. Howard, Mervyn Gifford, John Lumsden, “Changes in electrocortical measure of impulsivity during the menstrual cycle,” Personality and Individual Differences, 9 (1988): 917-918. (Link)

12. Karen J. Pine, Ben C. Fletcher, “Women’s spending behaviour is menstrual-cycle sensitive,” Personality and Individual Differences, 50 (2011): 74-78. (Link)

13. Donna E. Stewart, “Positive changes in the premenstrual period,” Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 79 (1989): 400-405. (Link)
Paula Englander-Golden, et al. “Female sexual arousal and the menstrual cycle,” Journal of Human Stress, 6 (1980): 42-48. (Link)

14. Rosalind Brock, Georgina Rowse, Pauline Slade, “Relationships between paranoid thinking, self-esteem and the menstrual cycle,” Archives of Women’s Mental Health, 19 (2016): 271-279. (Link)

15. Dmitry M. Davydov, David Shapiro, Iris B. Goldstein, “Moods in everyday situations: Effects of menstrual cycle, work, and personality,” Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 56 (2004): 27-33. (Link)

16. Louise Dye, John Blundell, “Menstrual cycle and appetite control: implications for weight regulation,” Human Reproduction, 12 (1997): 1142-1151. (Link)
Ellen Freeman, et al., “Treatment of premenstrual syndrome with a carbohydrate‐rich beverage,” International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics, 77 (2002): 253-254. (Link)
Larry Christensen, “The effect of carbohydrates on affect,” Nutrition, 13 (1997): 503-514. (Link)
Richard J. Wurtman, Judith J. Wurtman, “Brain Serotonin, Carbohydrate‐Craving, Obesity and Depression,” Obesity, 3 (1995): 4775-4805. (Link)
Judith J. Wurtman, “Carbohydrate craving: Relationship between carbohydrate intake and disorders of mood,” Drugs, 39 (1990): 49-52. (Link)

17. Huiyong Zheng, et al. “Actigraphy-defined measures of sleep and movement across the menstrual cycle in midlife menstruating women: Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation Sleep Study,” Menopause, 22 (2015): 66-74. (Link)
Fiona C. Baker, Helen S. Driver, “Self-reported sleep across the menstrual cycle in young, healthy women,” Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 56 (2004): 239-243. (Link)
Rachel Manber, Richard R. Bootzin, “Sleep and the Menstrual Cycle,” Health Psychology, 16 (1997). (Link)

18. Marco Carotenuto, et al., “Acupressure therapy for insomnia in adolescents: a polysomnographic study,” Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, 9 (2013): 157-162. (Link)
Mei-Jou Lu, et al., “Acupressure improves sleep quality of psychogeriatric inpatients,” Nursing Research, 62 (2013): 130-137. (Link)

19. Bülent Güven, Hayat Güven, Selçuk Çomoğlu, “Clinical characteristics of menstrually related and non-menstrual migraine,” Acta Neurologica Belgica, 177 (2017): 671-676. (Link)

20. Alessandra Graziottin, Audrey Serafini, “Perimenstrual asthma: from pathophysiology to treatment strategies,” Multidisciplinary Respiratory Medicine, 11 (2016): published online August 1, 2016. (Link)
Chitra K. Rao, “Characteristics of perimenstrual asthma and its relation to asthma severity and control: data from the Severe Asthma Research Program,” Chest, 143 (2013): 984-992. (Link)

21. Andrew G Herzog, “Catamenial epilepsy: Update on prevalence, pathophysiology and treatment from the findings of the NIH Progesterone Treatment Trial,” Seizure, 28 (2015): 18-25. (Link)

22. Shishira Bharadwaj, et al., “Symptomatology of irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease during the menstrual cycle,” Gastroenterology Report, 3 (2015): 185-193. (Link)
Lesley A. Houghton, et al., “The menstrual cycle affects rectal sensitivity in patients with irritable bowel syndrome but not healthy volunteers,” Gut, 50 (2002): 471-474. (Link)

23. Cathy J. Watson, “Premenstrual vaginal colonization of Candida and symptoms of vaginitis,” Journal of Medical Microbiology, 61 (2012): 1580-1583. (Link)
Aliza Kalo-Klein, Steven S. Witkin, “Candida albicans: cellular immune system interactions during different stages of the menstrual cycle,” American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 161 (1989): 1132-1136. (Link)

24. “Female Sex Hormone Is Tied To Ability to Perform Tasks,” The New York Times, November 18, 1988, A00001. (Link)

25. Cintia Ishii, Lucia Kazuko Nishino, Carlos Alberto Herrerias de Campos, “Vestibular characterization in the menstrual cycle,” Brazilian Journal of Otorhinolaryngology, 75 (2009): 375-380. (Link)

26. Emma J. Brooker, et al., “Changes in saccadic latencies over the human menstrual cycle,” Perceptual and Motor Skills, 96 (2003): 1197-1214. (Link)
Inger Sundström, Torbjörn Bäckström, “Patients with premenstrual syndrome have decreased saccadic eye velocity compared to control subjects,” Biological Psychiatry, 44 (1998): 755-764. (Link)

27. Nataša Šimić, Arijana Ravlić, “Changes in basal body temperature and simple reaction times during the menstrual cycle,” Archives of Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology, 64 (2013): 99-106. (Link)
Sunil Kumar, Mehak Mufti, and Ravikiran Kisan, “Variation of reaction time in different phases of menstrual cycle,” Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research, 7 (2013): 1604-1605. (Link)

28. Nienke Vulink, et al., “Female hormones affect symptom severity in obsessive-compulsive disorder,” International Clinical Psychopharmacology, 21 (2006): 171-175. (Link)
Javier Labad, et al., “Female reproductive cycle and obsessive-compulsive disorder,” The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 66 (2005): 428-435. (Link)

29. Shirley Hartlage, Dana Brandenburg, Howard Kravitz, “Premenstrual Exacerbation of Depressive Disorders In a Community-Based Sample in the United States,” Psychosomatic Medicine, 66 (2004): 698-706. (Link)

30. J. Frederieke Van Veen, et al., The effects of female reproductive hormones in generalized social anxiety disorder, The International Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine, 39 (2009): 283-285. (Link)

31. Caroline Morini Calil, et al., “Influence of gender and menstrual cycle on volatile sulphur compounds production,” Archives of Oral Biology, 53 (2008): 1107-1112. (Link)

32. Diana Armbruster, et al., “The impact of sex and menstrual cycle on the acoustic startle response,” Behavioural Brain Research, 1 (2014): 326-333. (Link)

33. Xenia Protopopescu, et al., “Orbitofrontal cortex activity related to emotional processing changes across the menstrual cycle,” PNAS, 102 (2005): 16060-16065. (Link)
Joseph M.Andreano, LarryCahill, “Menstrual cycle modulation of medial temporal activity evoked by negative emotion,” NeuroImage, 53 (2010): 1286-1293. (Link)

34. Alvaro Sanchez, et al., “Gaze-fixation to happy faces predicts mood repair after a negative mood induction,” Emotion, 14 (2014): 85-94. (Link)

Day 24

1. Audra L. Gollenberg, et al., “Perceived Stress and Severity of Perimenstrual Symptoms: The BioCycle Study”, Journal of Women’s Health, 19 (2010): 959-967. (Link)

2. Scott C. Hutchings, et al., “Modification of aftertaste with a menthol mouthwash reduces food wanting, liking, and ad libitum intake of potato crisps,” Appetite, 108 (2017): 57-67. (Link)

3. Mirjam Münch, et al., “Blue-Enriched Morning Light as a Countermeasure to Light at the Wrong Time: Effects on Cognition, Sleepiness, Sleep, and Circadian Phase,” Neuropsychobiology, 74 (2016): 207-218. (Link)

4. Dolf Zillmann, Karla J. Schweitzer, Norbert Mundorf, “Menstrual cycle variation of women’s interest in erotica,” Archives of Sexual Behavior, 23 (1994): 579-597. (Link)
Jeanne M. Meadowcroft, Dolf Zillman, “Women’s Comedy Preferences During the Menstrual Cycle,” Communication Research, 14 (1987): 204-218. (Link)

Day 25

1. Jennifer Oates, “The Effect of Yoga on Menstrual Disorders: A Systematic Review,” Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, published online June 1, 2017. (Link)

2. Erin Hanlon, et al., “Sleep Restriction Enhances the Daily Rhythm of Circulating Levels of Endocannabinoid 2-Arachidonoylglycerol,” Sleep, 39 (2016): 653-664. (Link)
Kristen L. Knutson, Eve Van Cauter, “Associations between sleep loss and increased risk of obesity and diabetes,” Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1129 (2008): 287-304. (Link)

3. Luc P. Beaudoin, et al., “Serial diverse imagining task: A new remedy for bedtime complaints of worrying and other sleep-disruptive mental activity,” Conference: SLEEP 2016. (Link)

4. Jennifer Oates, “Perceived Stress and Severity of Perimenstrual Symptoms: The BioCycle Study,” Journal of Women’s Health, 19 (2010): 959-967. (Link)

Day 26

1. Elizabeth R. Bertone-Johnson, et al., “Calcium and vitamin D intake and risk of incident premenstrual syndrome,” Archives of Internal Medicine, 165 (2005): 1246-1252. (Link)

2. Gary Frost, et al., “The short-chain fatty acid acetate reduces appetite via a central homeostatic mechanism,” Nature Communications, 5 (2014): published online April 29, 2014. (Link)

3. Elena Rasskazova, et al., “High intention to fall asleep causes sleep fragmentation,” Journal of Sleep Research, 23 (2014): 295-301. (Link)

4. Vincent T. Martin, “Ovarian hormones and pain response: a review of clinical and basic science studies,” Gender Medicine, 6 (2009): 168-192. (Link)
Yannick Tousignant-Laflamme, Serge Marchand, “Excitatory and inhibitory pain mechanisms during the menstrual cycle in healthy women,” Pain, 146 (2009): 47-55. (Link)

5. Denise Falcone, et al., “Sensitive skin and the influence of female hormone fluctuations: results from a cross-sectional digital survey in the Dutch population,” European Journal of Dermatology, 27 (2017): 42-48. (Link)

6. N. Pedrón Nuevo, Marco Unzaga, R. Medina Santillan, “Preventive treatment of primary dysmenorrhea with ibuprofen,” Ginecologia y Obstetrica de Mexico, 66 (1998): 248-252. (Link)

7. Justina Lipscomb, Mark Wong, Marlena Birkel, “Management of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug-Induced Hypersensitivity Reactions,” U.S. Pharmacist, 44 (2019): 22-26. (Link)

8. Bahi Takkouche, Fatine Hadrya, Jesus Prego-Dominguez, “Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Chronic Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis,” Pain Physician, 19 (2016): 521-535. (Link)

9. Saeideh Ziaei, Majid Zakeri, Anoshirvan Kazemnejad, “A randomised controlled trial of vitamin E in the treatment of primary dysmenorrhoea,” BJOG, 112 (2005): 466-469. (Link)

10. Johanna N. Kues, et al., “The effect of manipulated information about premenstrual changes on the report of positive and negative premenstrual changes,” Women & Health, 58 (2018): 16-37. (Link)
Gudrun Kaiser, et al., “Knowledge about Positive Premenstrual Changes and Somatosensory Amplification Increase the Report of Positive Premenstrual Changes: An Experimental Study,” Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, 87 (2018): 237-239. (Link)
Aimee Aubeeluck, Moira Maguire, “The Menstrual Joy Questionnaire Items Alone Can Positively Prime Reporting of Menstrual Attitudes and Symptoms,” Psychology of Women Quarterly, 26 (2002): 160-162. (Link)
Donna E. Stewart, “Positive changes in the premenstrual period,” Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 79 (1989): 400-405. (Link)

Day 27

1. Lynne J. Lamarche, “Napping during the late‐luteal phase improves sleepiness, alertness, mood and cognitive performance in women with and without premenstrual symptoms,” Sleep and Biological Rhythms, 8 (2010): 151-159. (Link)

2. JessicaSkorka-Brown, et al., “Playing Tetris decreases drug and other cravings in real world settings,” Addictive Behaviors, 51 (2015): 165-170. (Link)

3. Allehe Seyyedrasooli, et al., “The Effect of Footbath on Sleep Quality of the Elderly: A Blinded Randomized Clinical Trial,” Journal of Caring Sciences, 2 (2013): 305-311. (Link)
Eun-Jung Sung, Yutaka Tochihara, “Effects of bathing and hot footbath on sleep in winter,” Journal of Physiological Anthropology and Applied Human Science, 19 (2000): 21-27. (Link)

Day 28

1. Iris W. Hung, Aparna A. Labroo, “From Firm Muscles to Firm Willpower: Understanding the Role of Embodied Cognition in Self-Regulation,” Journal of Consumer Research, 37 (2011): 1046-1064. (Link)

2. Alex M. Wood, et al., “Gratitude influences sleep through the mechanism of pre-sleep cognitions,” Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 66 (2009): 43-48. (Link)

3. Donald J. Brambilla, et al., “The Effect of Diurnal Variation on Clinical Measurement of Serum Testosterone and Other Sex Hormone Levels in Men,” The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 94 (2009): 907-913. (Link)